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Powering Everything Internet

Fiber Splicing



After all the permits, and construction, now comes the last major piece before you can plug in the electonics and start using the fiber you built!

Splicing is the action of taking those pieces of fiber cable you put in the ground/attached to the hydro poles, and connect them together. Since these fiber cables are many many many strands of glass, we will fuse single strands together (to simplify, think back to soldering in shop class, but this time you're melting two strands of glass together to make one almost perfect strand of glass) to make essentially very long strands of glass, on which we can send light/a signal down to enable communications.

Aerial Fiber: in the case of Aerial fiber attached to hydro poles, a fiber technician will use a ladder/bucket truck, and delash the fiber splice enclosure (also referred to as a fiber "can"). Usually you will have a 10m/20yard or more coil of extra fiber on the pole which allows you to take the splice enclosure to ground level, without cutting the fiber cable connections. The Fiber technician will then usually take that splice enclosure with the fiber cable attached into the back of his truck, put the splice enclosure on a table, open it up, and perform at splicing/fusing needed. The reason fiber technicians like to splice inside, is for a cleaner environment. Any dirt that gets into the cable will degrade performance of the fiber cable. Remember they are fusing two strands of glass together to make an almost perfect strand of glass, any dirt or dust that gets into the process is extremely bad.. Test, and re-attach to the aerial infrastructure and move on to the next job.


Buried Splicing: Almost identical to aerial splices, except the splice enclosure is in a vault (also known as Box, Flush to Grade, Grade Level Box, Manhole, Handwell, etc..).. This means that there might be dirt, mud and WATER in that vault/manhole.. Again the Fiber technician will then usually take that splice enclosure with the fiber cable attached into the back of his truck, put the splice enclosure on a table, clean the splice enclosure up, open it up, and perform at splicing/fusing needed. Then as in aerial splicing test, close the splice enclosure back up, and place back into the vault/manhole.

In both cases, the Fiber Technician is out in the elements, dealing with the weather, rain, water, mud, dirt, etc... so if you're thinking of a job as a Fiber Splicing Technician keep that in mind. Mind you, a splicer will do the majority of his work in the back of his truck, unlike the technicians that do the trenching, directional drilling, digging of manholes, and placing/pulling of fibre who spend 95% of their time working outdoors in the elements.



If you have any questions, comments, or suggestions, feel free to email us at: webmaster@modemhelp.org Thanks and enjoy the site!

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